Turquoise


turquoise

LA turquoise

Turquoise is an opaque mineral that comes in beautiful shades of blue, bluish green, green and yellowish green. It has been considered a gemstone for thousands of years. Isolated from one another, the ancient peoples of Africa, Asia, South America and North America made turquoise one of their materials of choice for the production of precious stones, inlays and small sculptures.
Very few minerals have a color so well known, so characteristic and so impressive that the name of the mineral becomes so commonly used. Only three other minerals - gold, silver and copper - have a color that is more often used in everyday language than turquoise.
Turquoise is best formed in an arid climate, and this determines the geography of the sources of turquoise. Most of the world's raw turquoises are currently produced in the southwestern United States, China, Chile, Egypt, Iran and Mexico.
In these regions, precipitation seeps down through the soil and rock, dissolving small amounts of copper. When this water is then evaporated, copper combines with aluminum and phosphorus to deposit tiny amounts of turquoise on the walls of underground fractures.

The earliest mention of the use of turquoise in jewelry or ornamentation comes from Egypt. Turquoise has been found there in royal graves over 6000 years old. About 4000 years ago, Persian miners produced a variety of blue turquoise in the color "sky blue" or "bluebird egg". This material was very popular and was traded across Asia and Europe. This is the source of the term "Persian blue".
In North America, the earliest known use of turquoise was found in the Chaco Canyon region of New Mexico, where the gem was used over 2,000 years ago. Ancient artists produced beads, pendants, inlays and small sculptures.
Raw turquoise and turquoise objects were held in high esteem by Native Americans and were widely traded. North American turquoise has thus spread in the southwest and in South America. These first Native American jewels were simple and turquoise was not set in metal pieces.


Learn more about turquoise: Wikipedia


turquoise

Language
French
Open drop down